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How many Drip, Drip, Drips does it take to lose a Million Dollars?

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Water costs at Baltimore City High Schools

It was a joy to learn with the bright students at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute last week.  The students worked hard and offered the guest speakers great questions and great respect.

I’d like to challenge the students (and anyone who wishes) to understand and present the City Schools energy data accurately and informatively. Access to open and accurate information can help us understand and solve problems.

I’ve put together graphs and pie charts using the water data supplied by City Schools.
More data from City Schools is available in the resources section of this website.

Please use the original data from City Schools to create your own graphs or check the accuracy of my graphs.

Here are some important items to consider when we interpret this data and create our graphs and charts.

1) Schools vary by size, so we would expect to see some differences in energy and water use between schools because of their size.
You may want to create graphs that show the square footage of the building next to their water or energy use.

2) Poly/Western share a campus and their energy/utility systems, so we need to combine them to effectively benchmark their energy/water use or compare them to
other schools. Delegating water use to one school and oil to another when in fact they are sharing these resources is not helpful in understanding how these
schools use energy.

3) Sometimes the data can simply be wrong.  Errors in gathering, tabulating or calculating data can give us false data, so it is wise to check for these errors
as we interpret the numbers.

4) We would also need to consider the effect of operations and mission of a school. Having a pool could increase water use a bit, having air conditioning
or staying open longer for school events could increase energy use. These things support students and the community, so we don’t see this as waste.
Our work is to eliminate energy waste (lights and equipment on 24/7, broken windows, inefficient systems) so we can fund the things that help us learn and
succeed.

5) Does the presentation of our information (graph, chart, written or spoken language) clearly and accurately explain the situation?

6) Did we include all relevant data and captions explaining how to interpret and act on the information we supply?

7) Is a high utility bill a temporary problem that is solved immediately, or is it a long term problem that hasn’t been addressed?

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Water use at Baltimore City Public High Schools.

I’m looking forward to seeing your charts and graphs on the energy and water use of the Baltimore City Public Schools.

 

 

Baltimore City Schools Water use 2014 High Schools Chart final

 

Water Use at City High Schools by cost FY 2014

Water use at City High Schools FY 2013

Poly-14-3 with totals

WATER-SEWER_Five_Year_Comparison-1-8-14

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The Chief Eternal Optimist of Bronx County

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I grew this!
Stephen Ritz introduces himself as the “Chief Eternal Optimist of Bronx County”.

It’s a place that needs optimism.

The Bronx is a tough neighborhood with high unemployment and the rumble of food insecurity. The New York City Coalition Against Hunger reported in December, 2013 that nearly 49 percent of Bronx children lived in a household with an inconsistent food supply.
Equally alarming, children in the Bronx have little access to fresh food, often eating foods high in sugar and fat, but low in nutritional value.
“We have some of the greatest rates of juvenile diabetes and juvenile obesity in the nation,” Ritz says. “And we can change that. We absolutely have the power to change schools in this generation.”

So where does Ritz get this optimism?
He grows it—with his students.

“The excitement and joy that these little kids feel putting a seed in the ground and watching it blossom—OMG! “ Ritz exclaims. “It’s game changing! It’s empowering!”
“When they know that they can grow their own, they really start changing the way they see their relationship to the world and their place in it,” Ritz says. “They are growing, the plants are growing, and they are responsible for it.”

Vegetables are sprouting in trays, on walls, and from the sides of tower gardens. This growing infuses the classroom—and their lessons. Students learn the science of nutrition and growth. Names of vegetables teach consonant blends. The price of supplies and earnings help students learn math. Growing puts green in their wallets and trains students for jobs and business. With their learning aligned with their lives, students can create, taste and count real reasons to come to school. School attendance grew from 40 percent to 93 percent. Students are heading to college, not jail.

“For so many, food is the problem. Yet for all of us, food is a solution,” Ritz says.

In places adults didn’t think could grow plants, Ritz and his students are growing an answer to poor prenatal nutrition, the cause of 70 percent of learning disabilities. They are growing an answer to dropping out, unemployment and powerlessness with relevant learning, work and constant encouragement. “We are Ameri-CANS!, not Ameri-can’ts, “ Ritz proclaims.

“I’m not a farmer,” Ritz says, “But I’m planting. I’m planting seeds.”

Ritz has planted success in his students with this approach. But there is only one Stephen Ritz. How do we grow crops of transformative teachers and learning projects?

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STEM Learning in the Garden

I grew this! 
Shows girl with carrot.
I grew this!

Students can learn STEM by growing and studying in gardens

STEM Learning in the Garden

As teachers and administrators search for ways to improve student performance, they should look in the garden.

Learning in the garden is real, alive and surprising. Here discoveries of “bugs!” and “worms!” are shouted out and children run to the discoveries.            Suddenly the questions aren’t coming from the teacher; they are coming from the students eager to observe, learn and understand their world.

The gold of classroom learning is the“Ah Ha” moment when the student makes a discovery or connection.
The garden is full of “Ah Ha’s” but it also has the “Umph” moments of exercise, the “Yum Yum” moments of tasting and the “We Did It!” moments of accomplishment. While say we are growing a garden, we are really growing children who become stronger through exercise, healthier through better diets, and more powerful with their learning and actions.

Dig out one shovel of soil and you have a lesson in geology, archeology, chemistry and biology.

Why is the soil here different than the soil two feet down or over by the wall?  What is this rock and how was it made?  Where did that piece of tile, metal or root come from? What was here before? Can you see the roots, insects and larvae in the soil? What do they consume?  How does water percolate through the soil?

What do plants need from the soil? 

Here are questions about chemistry, biology and botany. How can we test and amend the soil to provide the right combination of nutrients for this plant? What crops and rotations can replenish the soil?

What will we plant?

Here are questions about how we use and value plants.  Where did these plants come from?  How have they been used for foods, medicines, spices, teas, baskets, building materials and clothes and dyes?  How foods become part of our cultural identity. How we can grow and distribute food to create healthier families, profits or materials?

Where will we plant?

Here are questions that involve the rotation earth around the sun, an understanding of the soil, drainage, sun exposure, the needs of particular plants, the design of the garden and paths.  The garden is a world that our children can help build.

How will we tend the garden?

Here are questions about the needs of different plants, different seasons and different helpers. School gardens are a perfect opportunity to create collaboration among students, parents and teachers as they work together.  Who will tend the plants during the summer?

How will we share our produce?

Here are questions of sharing and earning that go to the core of our ethical and economic systems. How much do we give away? Do we sell it? How can we provide nutrition to mothers and newborns so our children grow up without learning disabilities?

Want common core observations and analysis? STEM learning?

In the garden students observe and interact with complex systems:air, water, sun, temperature, soil, plants, insects and animals. What are the needs of our plants and how can we create the right combination of conditions to create better crops? Our children learn to observe, test, create solutions and improve outcomes.  Perhaps the best lessons are that a garden is never done and that there is always next year.


Plant a seed and watch it grow
.

This simple act reveals the awe of life and our responsibility to care and nurture living things.

Longer Reach of the Teach

Numerous studies show that outdoor education improves test scores for children.
But when you see the bright eyes and smiles of children who are excited by their discoveries and accomplishments you will truly understand the importance of this learning. Students who are bored in class can come alive with the real learning and active work of a garden. You will be amazed at how well your garden will grow your students. This is learning as fresh and tasty as a pea plucked from the vine.

Learning in the Garden

Green Team members from Highland Town Elementary School make the salad at the Learning in the Garden Workshop at Real Food Farm.
Green Team members from Highland Town Elementary Middle  School #237 make the salad at the Learning in the Garden Workshop at Real Food Farm.
Jason Reed leads a workshop on Learning in the Garden at Real Foods Farm in Baltimore.
Jason Reed leads a workshop on Learning in the Garden at Real Foods Farm in Baltimore.
Mixing the ingredients for the salad dressing is part of the learning at the Learning in the Garden workshop
Mixing the ingredients for the salad dressing is part of the learning at the Learning in the Garden workshop
“Zesty!” The salad dressing gets a great review from a Green Team member from Highland Elementary Middle School #237.
The fresh salad makes a big hit at the Learning in the Garden workshop.
The fresh salad makes a big hit at the Learning in the Garden workshop.
Michel
Michel Anderson from the Waldorf School discusses school gardens during the Learning in the Garden Workshop at Real Food Farm in Baltimore. The session was led by Jason Reed, a garden educator for Living Classrooms.
Bob Boulter helps Green Team members from Highlandtown Elementary Middle  School #237 plan their school garden
Bob Boulter helps Green Team members from Highlandtown Elementary Middle School #237 plan their school garden
 
Students from Highlandtown Elementary Middle School #237 dish out the fresh salad at the Learning in the Garden workshop at Real Food Farm in Baltimore.
Students from Highlandtown Elementary Middle School #237 dish out the fresh salad at the Learning in the Garden workshop at Real Food Farm in Baltimore.
Students at Highlandtown Elementary dig deep to get the salads for the workshop participants of the Learning in the Garden workshop at Real Food Farm.
Students at Highlandtown Elementary dig deep to get the salads for the workshop participants of the Learning in the Garden workshop at Real Food Farm.
Jason Reed, garden educator with Living Classrooms, leads a discussion on how to create great learning in school gardens.
Jason Reed, garden educator with Living Classrooms, leads a discussion on how to create great learning in school gardens.
A workshop participant  lists the things they want to include in their school garden.
A workshop participant
lists the things they want to include in their school garden.
Creating his garden: a student concentrates as he draws out his garden plan.  Outdoor education captures the imagination of students with real and important learning that combines math, science, art, language and systems learning.
Creating his garden:
a student concentrates as he draws out his garden plan. Outdoor education captures the imagination of students with real and important learning that combines math, science, art, language and systems learning.

Solving for whY: Finding the Right Angle to Teach Math with Meaning

posted in: Healthy Schools, STEM, STEM learning | 0

Solving for WHY: Finding the Right Angle to Teach Math with Meaning.

Poor Y. Every year, millions of students try to solve Y’s intractable problems. They furrow their brows and scratch out long formulas smudged with erasures, red ink and tears. But despite all the best efforts of the students, Y returns each year with its problems expanded and more complicated than the year before.

So year after year our children run the gauntlets of math to solve things for x without knowing why. Some students survive these battles; others are scarred as losers in a contest that appears both incomprehensible and meaningless.

This is more effective at sorting winners from losers than solving real problems or educating students for their work or their role as citizens. If math is a tool to empower our children, how is it that many of our students fear it and some of our A students can’t calculate how much seed they need for a garden plot, understand a financial statement or tell when the numbers or politicians are lying?

What if we flipped the equation? Instead of solving the problems of numbers and letters, what if we used them to help solve real problems that we have? What if we learned with and played with the math around us in ways that made our lives and world better?

Real math is going on all around the school. The building manager has to decide how much grass seed to buy for the athletic field, how much fuel oil and cleaning products to buy, how much money they could save with energy renovations, how much garbage the school produces. The janitors have to decide how to dilute chemicals, how to clean the floors efficiently, the best routes and schedules for delivering supplies and replacing light bulbs. The kitchen staff needs to create proper ratios for recipes, estimate food consumption and track food waste. The school nurse has to track absences and illnesses. Principals track student performance. The schools are built to design standards that include the rise of the stairs, width of doorways, air exchange rates, roof loads and energy efficiency. But the math which keeps us safe, healthy, saves money and solves real problems isn’t invited into math classes.

But what if it was? School staff could show students how math is part of their jobs and show them how to use it artfully to solve problems. Students could create new solutions at their schools, their homes and in their lives.

What if students calculated how much money could the school save if it turned off the lights and computers at night? Or how much food they could grow at their school? Or how they could reduce storm water runoff at their school?
What if students calculated the difference in their life span based on drug/alcohol use, exercise, occupation and zip code? Could they devise a formula to live longer and stronger?

What if students started examining the cost of global climate change vs the costs to avoid it?
These are the calculations that matter in the lives of our children.
Let’s put a real “why” back into the equations and help them solve the problems in their futures.