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Taking Green Street to Hilton Street

Forgive the pounding of hammers and the whine of saws at 125 North Hilton Street. They are uncovering a lost jewel of a school. The former Gwynns Falls Park Junior High School was poorly maintained and was closed in 1985. When it was built in 1926, it was the most expensive Baltimore city public school with large windows, two hour fire walls, beautiful floors and an indoor courtyard. This renovation will feature breakout rooms, white boards, technology studios, community and career centers, a green roof, hanging plants, gardens and aquaponics. The eight acre site offers space for play, greenhouses and reaches the Gwynns Falls stream.

The price? At $23 million dollars for 145,000 square feet, its cost ($158.62) per square foot is almost half the average estimated cost for the 21st Century Building project in Baltimore ($309).

By moving the school closer to its students and bus routes, the school helps its students get to school easier.

Perhaps most importantly, the school intends to involve its students in the design of the school, giving them a chance to learn about and help create their own school.

Baltimore City Public Schools….are you listening and learning?

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Will Green Street Academy break through the barriers of low expectations and excuses in Baltimore?
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Sean Winston and Jerome Crowder take a swing at “Fail” and “Excuses” during a groundbreaking ceremony at the future site of Green Street Academy at 125 North Hilton Street in Baltimore. Green Street Academy is presently located in a Baltimore City Public school building at 201 North Bend Road in Baltimore.
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Looking into the future.
The inner courtyard at the school will feature hanging plants and a hydroponic system.
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Jon Constable, Seawall Development, points out a test area where the hardwood floors had been sanded and refinished.
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Dr. Dan Schochor, Executive Director of Green Street Academy and Michael Phillips, Pastor at Kingdom Life Church prepare to break through the wall of low expectations at the groundbreaking ceremony for the future site of Green Street Academy. Kingdom Life Church will maintain a separate space in the building.

IMG_6645 by Shan Gordon.

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David Warnock and Lawrence Rivitz, Co-Founders of the Green Street Academy swing at “Fail” and “Excuses” scrawled in spray paint during a groundbreaking ceremony at the future site of Green Street Academy.
IMG_6596 by Shan Gordon.
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake shows off her muscles after striking the ground breaking wall with a sledgehammer.
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Sean Winston and Jerome Crowder talk about the opportunities that they have had to learn at Green Street Academy.
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David Warnock, Co-Founder of Green Street Academy, talks about the change the school is trying to create in Baltimore.
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The renovation at the future site of Green Street Academy is underway.
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Health Lessons for Schools: How students can improve the health and learning conditions at their schools.

What would happen if students examined their school, homes and habits in the same way that doctors examined a patient?
Could they start to identify and change things in their school and home environments that hinder their health and learning?
Could they identify and change their own choices to improve their health and learning?
Could examining their school with health, building and energy professionals help them see potential career paths?

Yes.

We got a glimpse of how this could work last month when sixty students from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute examined the health and learning conditions in their school and its energy use over four class sessions. Students also learned about the 21st century school building project and architecture in another class session.

Benchmarking schools for health and learning conditions and calculating ROI for energy projects.

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A student takes temperature and humidity readings near a heating unit in his classroom. These readings were not part of the benchmarking protocol, but this innovation proved that the unit was working.
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Keith Madigan, a building engineer, shows students how to examine and compare energy data and how to use return on investment calculations to identify potential energy savings.

Students learned how to use tools and collect data to benchmark classrooms for lighting, natural light, temperature, humidity and Co2 levels from Keith Madigan, of Madigan and Associates. Madigan helped students understand how to benchmark their school using Operations Report Card by the Collaborative for High Performing Schools and Energy Star Portfolio Manager.

How to Understand and Reduce the Health Effects of Asthma and Lead.

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Erin Quinn talks with students about asthma related ER visits in Baltimore. Baltimore has asthma rates near double the state average with the highest rates of asthma related ER visits in a band of low income neighborhoods

Rebecca Rehr from the Maryland Environmental Health Network talked with students about asthma and asthma triggers. Students learned about programs that provide renovations and trainings to reduce asthma triggers at homes and how green cleaning can reduce asthma attacks. Rehr, a graduate of Poly, talked about how a health presentation at Poly during her junior year sparked her interest in health professions. She told students that when she attended Poly, the water fountains were turned off because of concern about lead in the water, but students weren’t involved in learning around this issue.

After presenting the asthma statistics from the classes, a student noted that he was absent from school the week when the students filled out the forms—due to asthma. It was a good lesson about our need to collect data carefully and fully. The survey results are here Poly charts and data asthma and at the end of this article.

*Survey results from the classes are included at the end of this report. School-wide asthma statistics hadn’t been supplied to Baltimore City Health Department by the health official at the school. Baltimore City Public Schools  failed to submit plans for green cleaning as required by Maryland state law.

Learning to Improve the Health and Learning Conditions at Your School (and Home) Environments

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Don Brock from Health and Safety at City Schools
shows students how he investigates and solves health problems in school.
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Latanya Carter tells students how they can use integrated pest management to reduce pests at the school without using chemicals that are harmful to students.
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Robert Griffin from Health and Safety at Baltimore City Public Schools teaches students how to test the Co2 levels in classrooms. The ventilation system wasn’t operating in one of the rooms tested, minimal air flow in another. Opening windows can provide fresh air if the ventilation system is not functioning properly and help students get the fresh air they need to concentrate on their work.
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Can you trace the travel path of the mouse?
The oils and grease on the mouse stick to the things they rub against and collect dark particles. The conduit provides a handy path to travel. Mice and cockroaches can be asthma triggers. Sealing entryways to the school and keeping food stored properly can reduce pests and improve indoor air quality.

Creating Community Support for Schools, Creating Schools that Support Communities.

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Frank Patinella of the ACLU talks with students about the
21st Century School Building project and how it supports their rights to equal education. Richard Gwynallen of the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council discussed how the council is working to grow community through the 21st Century Building project.

Understanding Architecture Inside and Out: The Systems and Heart of our Built Environments.

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Beverly Eisenberg talks with students about how architecture can protect, serve and inspire. Her lecture demonstrated the many interacting levels and systems involved in creating healthy and productive built environments.

Findings and items of interest:

• When we examined the energy and water use data for the Poly/Western campus (the schools share utilities and physical plant) we discovered that water use for Poly/Western in FY 2014 was $517,000 dollars–far higher than other high schools. The next highest water bill was $85,000 dollars. A look at historic data indicated that Poly/Western has had very high water use for several years. Energy and facilities staff has not yet indicated whether this water use has been reduced or whether there is an explanation on why it would be so high in comparison to other schools. Graphs showing the water use comparisons are found
here (Poly Water Use Charts) and at the end of this report.

• We found that the lecture room where we held most of the classes had no air flow through the ventilation/heating vents. When Co2 levels were tested in a nearby classroom, they were high despite the fact that the class had only been filled for a short time.

• Teachers and students didn’t seem to understand how to eliminate asthma triggers or that air vents and air handlers shouldn’t be blocked with classroom materials.

• The energy manager for the district insisted that boilers at the schools could not be switched from oil to gas. A staff member at the school insists that BGE certified that the boilers were dual fuel and able to use natural gas, a far cheaper fuel source at this time.

• There are a number of holes and penetrations in the building envelope ranging from ill fit window air conditioning units to unfitted ducting to doors that fail to close fully.

• Evidence of mold and water leaks in hallways and classrooms and peeling paint on the exterior.

• City Schools have not adopted green cleaning policies, procedures and purchasing despite Maryland state law.

• City Schools continues to have divided systems of reporting for information on asthma and lacks comprehensive reporting of asthma related absences.

• The square footage of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute and Western High School are listed differently from document to document.

Opportunities for learning activities at Poly/Western.

• Calculate the ROI of fuel change from oil to gas.

• Calculate the ROI of lighting change to LED

• Continued monitoring of temperature/humidity/air flow.

• Determine why lecture room has no air flow.

• Investigate why water use at Poly/Western is high.

• Help improve the collection and dissemination of asthma information.

• Offer eye chart exam for students to determine if they need correction to improve their ability to see and learn.

• Investigate the of costs and opportunities to provide internet/computer access to students at their homes.

• Monitor/identify and reduce pests at school with integrated pest management techniques.

• Enter energy use data into Energy Star Portfolio Manager.

• Calculate square footage for Poly and Poly/Western.

• Test for CO and mold.

• Test for lead in paint and in water supply.

• Monitor how chemicals and hazardous materials are used/stored at the school.

Students have an opportunity to use their learning to improve their health, learning and professional preparation.
Their work can provide schools with the knowledge and opportunities to lower their energy and maintenance costs while improving school attendance rates.
This is perfect STEM learning that combines health, learning, architecture, chemistry, biology, economics and social science in a hands on experiment to
create better outcomes for our students and our schools.

This work can help students meet the Core Curriculum and Next Generation Science Standards as they perform tests and create innovative engineering solutions in their immediate environment. School benchmarking can provide school facilities staff with ongoing information on the operations and maintenance of schools so they can better understand and respond to these issues before they become costly.

This learning project offers us a way to refocus and reconnect our schools to the health, learning and success of our students.
Today is the best day to start.

Graphs and data from student survey on asthma

Poly charts and data asthma

Graphs and data showing water use of Baltimore Polytechnic and Western compared to other City Schools.

Poly Water Use Charts

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Whole(y) Cow!

cow-learning-chart by . After years of divide and fail, can we reunite learning with STEM and project based learning?

Study a package of hamburger as long as you like, you will never understand a cow.

So why do we keep dividing learning into bite sized bits, cut out of context, meaning and purpose?
Can memorizing artificial labels on a lifeless, two dimensional chart help us understand or improve the cow?
Or does this simply enable us to divide and label our students in the same way we divided and labeled the cow?

Imagine instead that we challenged students to create a better cow. This forces them to understand “cow” and “better” in all dimensions.
What environments and foods strengthen cows? How do we balance our needs and responsibilities to cows? What diets and choices can keep us healthy?

STEM and project based learning reconstitutes learning, naturally combining and testing our understanding of all subjects.
This learning is rich and alive. It challenges students to understand interacting systems as they search for solutions.
This is how we have always produced stronger cows and more milk.
It can also produce innovative students ready to solve problems in their world.

If you are brave enough to admit that you don’t have every answer; that there can be more than one solution, embark at once upon this learning adventure with your students.
You will be amazed at how some of them will spark alive when they are offered a chance to touch and transform their world.

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How many Drip, Drip, Drips does it take to lose a Million Dollars?

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Water costs at Baltimore City High Schools

It was a joy to learn with the bright students at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute last week.  The students worked hard and offered the guest speakers great questions and great respect.

I’d like to challenge the students (and anyone who wishes) to understand and present the City Schools energy data accurately and informatively. Access to open and accurate information can help us understand and solve problems.

I’ve put together graphs and pie charts using the water data supplied by City Schools.
More data from City Schools is available in the resources section of this website.

Please use the original data from City Schools to create your own graphs or check the accuracy of my graphs.

Here are some important items to consider when we interpret this data and create our graphs and charts.

1) Schools vary by size, so we would expect to see some differences in energy and water use between schools because of their size.
You may want to create graphs that show the square footage of the building next to their water or energy use.

2) Poly/Western share a campus and their energy/utility systems, so we need to combine them to effectively benchmark their energy/water use or compare them to
other schools. Delegating water use to one school and oil to another when in fact they are sharing these resources is not helpful in understanding how these
schools use energy.

3) Sometimes the data can simply be wrong.  Errors in gathering, tabulating or calculating data can give us false data, so it is wise to check for these errors
as we interpret the numbers.

4) We would also need to consider the effect of operations and mission of a school. Having a pool could increase water use a bit, having air conditioning
or staying open longer for school events could increase energy use. These things support students and the community, so we don’t see this as waste.
Our work is to eliminate energy waste (lights and equipment on 24/7, broken windows, inefficient systems) so we can fund the things that help us learn and
succeed.

5) Does the presentation of our information (graph, chart, written or spoken language) clearly and accurately explain the situation?

6) Did we include all relevant data and captions explaining how to interpret and act on the information we supply?

7) Is a high utility bill a temporary problem that is solved immediately, or is it a long term problem that hasn’t been addressed?

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Water use at Baltimore City Public High Schools.

I’m looking forward to seeing your charts and graphs on the energy and water use of the Baltimore City Public Schools.

 

 

Baltimore City Schools Water use 2014 High Schools Chart final

 

Water Use at City High Schools by cost FY 2014

Water use at City High Schools FY 2013

Poly-14-3 with totals

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Creating Healthy, Smart Schools

posted in: Healthy Schools, Healthy Schools | 0

If we wish to create schools that  promote the health, learning and lives of our students,  we must involve students as full partners in this adventure.

When students help design and maintain their school environment, they gain knowledge, voice and responsibility.

In turn, the school gets expert advice on what works for kids, innovative ideas and children who feel ownership for their school.

Creating healthier, smarter schools starts and ends with creating healthier, smarter students, empowered by their learning, actions and decisions.

 

The following posts include :

Healthy, Wealthy and Wise, a learning project that involves students in understanding and improving their school environment,

A report on a Sustainability Study of Southwest Baltimore Charter School,

Videos of students and teachers describing how their energy study led to the installation of solar tubes to help light their school

School energy experts describing potential savings and successful energy challenges.

and an outline of  Innovate your School, an upcoming  innovation challenge at the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute.

I look forward to adding more projects to this list soon.   Do you have some that we should post here?

Let’s share this new way of empowering our children and improving our schools.

 

-shan