• Students enjoy playing on natural features in their playground.

  • I grew this! Students in school gardens grow their confidence, scientific knowledge and math skills. They feed their understanding of nutrition, too.

  • Students practice their leaf calls by blowing air across a blade of grass held between their thumbs.

  • Students paint storm drains to remind people that pollution and trash can flow directly into the harbor.

  • Mapping a garden combines geography, botany, spelling, math and art.

  • Turning algae into I'll go, students learn how to derive energy from algae.

  • Spat on the half shell. A baby oyster (spat) will be grown on an oyster shell in an oyster cage suspended in the Baltimore Harbor. Oysters filter sediment and pollutants from the water.

  • Gardening gives students a chance to investigate the natural world with awe and intense interest.

  • Scott Hartman takes students outside to learn about gardening, nutrition, biology, cooking and math. When he asked one class of students why the chickens were kept in a fenced in enclosure, a student anwered, "Because it did something really bad?"

Citizen Science Resources

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Citizen Science offers students a chance to make real observations and discoveries using scientific tools and procedures. While this can inspire some students to become scientists, it will help all students understand science and the world around them.

www.scistarter.com

www.studentsdiscover.org

https://fold.it

budburst.org
(link to article on using budburst:https://greenschoolsnationalnetwork.org/enhancing-life-science-education-project-budburst/ )

http://chesapeake.fieldscope.org

https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC6A9TC_2016-cache-across-maryland/

Link to articles on several citizen science programs:

GSNN

Lessons from Out of School

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Here is a peek at some moments from the 7th Annual MOST Conference.
This conference never fails to show me how these programs are bringing exciting and important learning to our children both in and out of schools. Great schools– and schools that want to be great–are wise to pursue partnerships with these programs. The less structured, more fun and experiential model of these programs can reach students which are overlooked or bored in classrooms.

Programs which range from nutrition to robotics to tennis offer students important information and mentors. These programs can fill gaps in the learning and health experiences which many schools no longer provide.

Think of three things that you learned as a child and that you love to do today. How many of those things were taught to you in a classroom and how many did you learn from a parent, friend, or out of school club or organization? Learning is everywhere. Our children will be more successful if we can connect them to their entire universe of learning and growth.

In three hours at the conference, I saw a guided conversation about racism, a session to promote STEM partnerships with the Applied Physics Laboratory, demonstrations of electricity, robotics and physics, a nutritional educational program, a presentation by students who created a world wide tutoring network, and a discussion on generational style differences.

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Ever thought about creating a world wide network of tutoring? You could ask these students how they did it.

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Remember recess? If your students don’t, talk with Playworks about how to get the most out of play at your school.

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If your students want to see how electricity and magnetism work, ask John Walstrum, PH.D at the National Electronics Museum for a demonstration. This piece shows how light striking solar panels can generate electricity to spin the motor and demonstrates polarity.

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Partnerships and collaborations are the best part of the conference. This session explored developing STEM partnerships with one of the premiere scientific laboratories in the world, the Applied Physics Lab.

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Want to see a room jammed with sweaty teenagers intent on only one thing? Go see a robotic competition hosted by Ed Mullin at the Baltimore Robotics Center at 1001 West Pratt Street in Baltimore.

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Science out of the Silos

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There is a new paradigm for scientific research that’s developing and it may be the biggest breakthrough science has ever made: community research grants. These grants offer communities and organizations a collaborative role... READ MORE