• The joy of nature

    Students enjoy playing on natural features in their playground.

  • What we grow by .

    I grew this! Students in school gardens grow their confidence, scientific knowledge and math skills. They feed their understanding of nutrition, too.

  • natural whistles by .

    Students practice their leaf calls by blowing air across a blade of grass held between their thumbs.

  • painting storm drains

    Students paint storm drains to remind people that pollution and trash can flow directly into the harbor.

  • STEM in Gardens by .

    Mapping a garden combines geography, botany, spelling, math and art.

  • Living classrooms2 by .

    Turning algae into I'll go, students learn how to derive energy from algae.

  • oyster spat

    Spat on the half shell. A baby oyster (spat) will be grown on an oyster shell in an oyster cage suspended in the Baltimore Harbor. Oysters filter sediment and pollutants from the water.

  • investigations by .

    Gardening gives students a chance to investigate the natural world with awe and intense interest.

  • outdoor classroom by .

    Scott Hartman takes students outside to learn about gardening, nutrition, biology, cooking and math. When he asked one class of students why the chickens were kept in a fenced in enclosure, a student anwered, "Because it did something really bad?"

How can Students Learn Science Without Doing Science?

posted in: Blog, Environmental STEM | 0

The experiment we are running in most science classes is whether students can learn science without doing science.

And this experiment is failing our students.

Yes, you can get students to memorize the periodic table and fill in the bubbles on biology tests by studying books and doing worksheets. If you push them hard, you might get a slight bump over last years test.

But how does that teach students to observe, form a testable hypothesis, and then design and perform an experiment to discover a solution to a problem?
It doesn’t.  

No coach would train their teams by giving up all their practice sessions so their players could read books about the Superbowl or fill out worksheets about the NBA. They know that practice is key to performance. It is how we learn.

Real science is about learning to observe, think, and innovate across a variety of disciplines. It is about curiosity and solving things. This is what the Next Generation Science Standards are expecting students do.
But like football, it takes practice to learn these key skills. And our students are not getting much practice.

Of course, students should read and learn about the scientific discoveries others have made. But they should also conduct their own experiments and make their own discoveries. This is the spark, soul, and hope of science.
This is where eyes light up and the Ah Ha moments start dancing about. Real science connects students to the joy and challenge of discovery. It teaches students that they are powerful, that they can create and improve.

Textbook science is boring and it alienates students.  So it’s no surprise that most students in Baltimore City Public Schools consistently score very poorly on math and science tests. This effectively excludes them from rewarding STEM careers in the center of a STEM economy.

We have to break free of our dependence on text book science if our students are going to have a chance to participate in STEM fields and careers. We have nothing to lose and a world of inventions and innovations to win.  Let’s start practicing.

Experiment US

posted in: Blog, Multimedia | 0

The US of America by . Cool Green Schools runs the Experiment You project to help students study and improve their health and learning.

America has been running the Experiment US project since 1776, offering citizens the right to study their choices and choose a path forward.  Today offers us another chance to make decisions that can make our country, our communities and our world better.  Each of us has the opportunity to guide our country, to make our mark on history.  Enjoy your choices and our freedom to make them together.

 

Oh, They Breathe? Connecting Schools to Student Needs.

You get what you measure.  When schools measure their success by the answers on test results, the importance of other factors, like physical,  social, and emotional health can be left out of the equation.

chairs-classroom-college-289740 by .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study after study will point out the importance of exercise in improving the health and learning of students, but physical education and recess are reduced to add more time and resources to tested subjects.   

Study after study will detail the importance of school conditions on the health and learning of students, but districts often fail to make needed repairs and renovations which could improve those conditions.  This is particularly true in poor school districts like Baltimore City Public Schools, which have suffered frequent budget cuts. 

Heating and Cooling

It is inadequate heating and air conditioning in Baltimore City Public Schools that has grabbed headlines.  Last winter when boilers failed, several schools closed for emergency repairs.  This year, many schools were closed half days for a week due to inadequate air conditioning.   It is stunning when our schools cannot provide moderate temperatures for our children which we would expect in any store, government or office building or prison.  The loss of classroom time and the disruption of academic and family schedules is tragic.  But temperature is only one of the factors that affects student performance.

Ventilation

Ventilation rates in many Baltimore City Public Schools are inadequate.  High Co2 levels can reduce student performance; inadequate air exchanges leave students breathing higher levels of indoor pollutants, increasing the likelihood of illness and asthma attacks.   In freezing winter days, you can see whole lines of windows open at some schools as teachers are trying to lower the temperatures in their overheated classrooms.  I used to squirm at the thought of the energy this wasted.  I still squirm, but I’m at least comforted that students are getting ample fresh air.

Asthma triggers

Dust, pests, mold and chemicals are frequent triggers of asthma attacks.  Schools with poor maintenance are more likely to have more asthma triggers.   Leaky roofs and plumbing can produce mold hazards, inadequate cleaning and pest control can result in airborne dust and pest allergens.    Children in Baltimore are twice as likely to have been diagnosed with asthma than children in Maryland as a whole, so asthma triggers in Baltimore City Public Schools may be sending a disproportionately high percentage of Baltimore children home or to a hospital with an asthma attack.  But we don’t know, because the school district does not track absences due to asthma. 

Nutrition

Baltimore City Public Schools offers free breakfast and lunch to all students, but not all students are eating these meals.  Many students arrive after breakfast service has ended.  Students often suggest that schools should offering fresher, more appealing food items.

Lighting

Classroom lighting is often cited as having a strong correlation to student learning and performance.  Most studies find that proper lighting, particularly from natural light sources (windows) is strongly correlated to student learning.  Some classrooms don’t have sufficient window light, but in many others, teachers are choosing to block out natural lighting for a variety of reasons: to project lessons on a screen, to control student behavior, to control classroom temperatures, or the blinds are inoperable. 

Building awareness of the effect of lighting in classrooms and developing appropriate choices for teachers could improve student health and learning.

Acoustics

Classroom acoustics determines whether students can hear the instruction, collaborate with each other, and focus on their work.  Loud fans, noise from other classrooms, loud announcement systems and bells can detract from the learning environment. 

 

A STEM Learning Project which connects schools to the needs of their students.

When students and teachers study how they can improve the health and learning conditions at their school, they are emerged in a hands on scientific investigation into improving their own environment and performance.   This can help connect the school to the physical, emotional, social and academic needs of students.

 

Here are some projects students could do at their schools. 

What is the optimal amount and source of light in classrooms?

  1. Test Light levels in 4 classrooms
  2. Test students
  3. Alter light levels (open blinds in 2 classrooms /turn off lights in 2 classrooms)
  4. Test students
  5. Survey students/teachers on their preferences for lighting

What is the existing range for temperature and humidity in our classrooms?  What is the optimal range?

  1. Select rooms to test
  2. Collect temp, humidity data
  3. Test students
  4. Control temp/(or wait until cold/hot temperatures)
  5. Test students
  6. Compare results.
  7. Survey students on the best temperature ranges.

What is the existing water quality at our school?:

  Test bacteria in water dispensers

  Test lead in water supply

  Test from inside school

  Test sidewalk near bus

 

Can students improve nutrition at the school?

 How old is the food?

 How much food waste?

 Are there other sources for food or ways to improve freshness and nutritional offerings?

 How many students refuse or choose not to eat?

 Survey and/or observe which students eat, which don’t.

 What effect do the vending machines have on student nutrition?  

How can we increase the number of students who eat breakfast?

Survey students

Test group of students in 1 or 2 classes.

Note: mice and cockroaches love leftovers.  If students eat in classrooms, they need to clean up.

How do asthma triggers affect student health and learning at our school?

Who has asthma?

How many asthma absences?

Survey

What are the asthma triggers in school?

Chemicals, cleaning agents, pests, dust, air quality.

How to quantify pests?

Survey, Pest Log, glue traps,

 

How do locked, dirty bathrooms affect students?

Are bathrooms available to students when needed?

Are bathrooms supplied and clean?

Survey students and teachers

Interview bathroom monitors, staff.

 

Can plants and air filters improve air quality in our school?

Measure and monitor air quality in classrooms

Introduce plants which clean air into one classroom

Introduce mechanical air filters into another clasroom

Remeasure the air quality in the classrooms

Compare the air quality in the test and control rooms.

Survey students and teachers on their opinions on air quality.in their classrooms.

 

Reporting Findings and Recommendations

The key to these projects are in the final steps: how do students innovate to try to solve these issues, how they report on their findings to their class, and to school and government officials. 

 

Learning to Live In Baltimore

posted in: Blog, Healthy Schools | 0

 

How schools can improve the health of students and their communities

The 2017 Neighborhood Health Report by the Baltimore City Health Department is hard to read.                               It spells out the stark disparities and desperation in our city with a clarity that is hard to confront.                           We don’t want the details about homicides, increasing overdoses, and low life expectancy to be about our city–but they are.   

It is no secret that death comes easy in Baltimore.  Average life expectancy here is 73.6 years, about five years less than the national average of 78.8 and six years less than the Maryland state average of 79.5.  This is disturbing, but when we compare life expectancy of our neighborhoods, the disparities are glaring.   

The Clifton-Berea (94.9% African American, median income $25,738) has a life expectancy of 66.9 years while Cross-Country/Cheswolde (72.9% White, median income $54,868) has a life expectancy of 87.1 years.   

This is a 20-year difference between life expectancy in a predominantly white, middle income neighborhood and a black, lower income neighborhood. We know that our neighborhoods have long been divided along    racial and economic lines, but this gap isn’t just the shadow of our segregated history, it’s the misery of life in poor, segregated neighborhoods today.

Chronic diseases like heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes and obesity are the leading causes of death in Baltimore and the nation.  In 2014, approximately one third of Baltimore City residents were obese.  Obesity is linked to high blood pressure, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Drugs and alcohol overdose deaths increased 56.6% from 2015 to 2016 when 694 people died.   Homicides, most related to drugs, add to this total of drug related deaths. There were 318 Homicides in 2016.   On the 300th day of 2017, 291 homicides have been recorded, a rate of nearly one a day. 

How long will we allow this misery to exist?                                                                                                          What will we do now to change these brutal statistics in the years ahead?

If our schools are truly preparing children for life, we need to ensure that they won’t suffer the same chronic diseases, addictions, and violence a few years into the future. 

Growing the mind, body and spirit of our children, their families, and their community should be the primary goal of our schools.   This is a key shift in how we now view the mission and role of schools.  

 

Here is a quick checklist.  How is your school doing?

  • Is every child getting good nutrition and learning to create healthy meals?
  • Is every child getting an hour of exercise every day?
  • Is every child getting regular medical, dental, and vision checkups?
  • Is every child offered mental health services?
  • Is every child offered meditation or yoga training to relieve stress?
  • Is every child connected to trusted adult mentors?
  • Is every child offered time to learn and play in nature?
  • Is every child learning conflict resolution and peer conflict mediation?            
  • Is every child taking health information home to their families on health access, addiction treatment programs, jobs and social services?
  • Is your school free from asthma triggers like mice, cockroaches, dust, bus idling, air fresheners and toxic cleaning materials?
  • Are classroom temperatures between 65 and 78 degrees?
  • Do students have free access to water and bathrooms?

                                      

Some of this is happening now. 

Some schools have yoga and meditation centers; some are improving their nutrition and outdoor education programs; some are instituting peer conflict mediation programs; some have health suites and vision care for students.  Some schools are involved with THREAD, which provides mentors for at risk students.

 

Some is not enough. 

Every school needs to meet the human needs of every child. This isn’t easy, and schools are already overwhelmed. Expanding out of school programs, integrating community programs, and bringing in more volunteers from the community can help create this change.

If we realign education to the needs of our students, they will do better in school–and in life. They will be ready to reclaim Baltimore and the years of life which are rightfully theirs.                                                  -shan

 

 

Want to learn more about health in Baltimore City? 

Here is a link to the 2017 health report on Baltimore City as a whole. 

https://health.baltimorecity.gov/sites/default/files/NHP%202017%20-%2000%20Baltimore%20City%20(overall)%20(rev%206-22-17).pdf

 

Here is the link to download the individual neighborhood profiles:

https://health.baltimorecity.gov/neighborhoods/neighborhood-health-profile-reports

 

Here are links to a variety of health maps.

 

2013 life expectancy:

http://baltimore.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=7c85a6d5b958496d863e738234373934

Teen birth rate

http://baltimore.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=7c85a6d5b958496d863e738234373934

Violent crime 2013

http://baltimore.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=7c85a6d5b958496d863e738234373934

Avertable deaths 2011

http://health.baltimorecity.gov/sites/default/files/Map_Healthy%20Baltimore%20-%20Avertable%20Deaths.pdf

2015 homicide epidemic

http://baltimore.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=995f2e81bd664b478a9039741c62ea3a

The Kirwan Commission, Waiting for Godot, part II

posted in: Home, Multimedia, News and Issues | 0

Two months ago, Baltimore City removed four Confederate statues from their pedestals.                                                               Now, if you want to see monuments to racism and inequity in our city, you can just walk to the nearest Baltimore City Public School.  Poor performing, highly segregated schools are the real monuments to injustice in Maryland.

I applaud the work of the Kerwan Commission to devise a more equable formula for school financing. This is not easy.  A chart showing state, local and federal funding sources and formulas has all the impossible complexity of a Rube Goldberg plumbing diagram.  Adjusting it toward equity creates a tug of war over resources with competing school districts and state and local governments. 

Should the State of Maryland increase it’s share of funding for students with learning disabilities or increase the per student payments?    Should it increase funding for schools with concentrated poverty?  Or should it ask counties to increase their share of the costs?  Do we go back to when the state reduced the cost of living increases, or start from where we are today? 

With all this complexity, how would you know if you are doing it right?                                                                                               Will nudges of the funding formula solve our problems of entrenched segregation, high dropout rates, unemployment and poverty?

They haven’t yet.  There is little evidence that they will.

Why do we spend our time with small nudges in the funding formulas if they don’t solve our problems?

The real test of this funding formula is not whether it produces equal finding, but whether it produces positive results, especially for those who have been left behind. 

Here is how to tell if the funding formula is working:

  • Does this funding significantly improve attendance, test scores, graduation, college attendance and employment rates?
  • Does this funding ensure that every student experiences the same environmental conditions and educational opportunities?

If students in impoverished or highly segregated areas are having to learn in buildings that are too hot or too cold, or unable to take advanced classes that lead to better futures, the formula isn’t working.  

Our test for school funding shouldn’t be the equality of the funding, but the equity of the results.

 

Four Recommendations

1. View education from a student perspective, not a school perspective.                                                                                    Too often we fund schools without solving the education, health, career, and higher education needs of our students. When we  look at how to solve student needs with funding, we can create effective and cost effective solutions tied directly to the needs, goals and outcomes of our children.   

  2. Fund education, not school districts.                                                                                                                                     Out of School Time Programs, online learning, certification programs provide innovative, low cost solutions to fulfill educational needs of students throughout the year.

  3.Support community schools.                                                                                                                                                            Wrap around health and social services at schools can help students and families access the services they  need.  

  4. Fund to create results.                                                                                                                                                               In most areas of life, we try to match the resources to the challenge.  If we are losing a battle, we rush to supply troops with the needed equipment and reinforcements to win.    But if a school is failing we often do nothing, or worse, reduce the resources they have.  Why are we so eager to surrender on this most important battlefield? 

 

Here are the four ways that the Kirwan Commission will know if it’s work is effective:

  1. Real estate signs won’t list County Schools on their home for sale signs.
  2. People with good jobs will send their students to city schools.
  3. The conditions in the Baltimore City Public Schools are as conductive to learning as schools in wealthy districts.
  4. Test scores, graduation and employment rates are consistent across the state.

 

Education is our most important investment in our society and our economy.  This is our opportunity to strengthen every part of our state, especially the children and the impoverished areas we have left behind. 

Thank you for your consideration and your service.

Shan Gordon                                                                                                                                                              www.coolgreenschools.com

 

 

 

                                                                                          

Renewing our Vowels

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Renewing Our Vowels:  A study of life goals.

 

Truth can be a trickster, revealing itself in unexpected moments.

It snuck up on me at a Hope and Help Festival at Lafayette Park in Baltimore. 

Leaned up against the wall, was a line of boards with lines of sentences, each starting with  

“Before I Die I want to” followed by a line, waiting for a chalked in answer.

One of those answers made me smile, “Renew my marriage vowels.”IMG_9566f2 by .

 

 

Had someone misspelled “vows?” 

Was this a licensing requirement for a scrabble player? 

Or was this a deeper message about the purpose of our lives and relationships? 

Should we live focused on the I, our personal wants and goals, or centered on the U, helping others?

The answers were chalked in across the board, in a landslide victory for U.

Here is a sampling of the responses:

“Save as many lives as I can”

“See peace for all races!!!!”

“Cure all diseases”

“Heal Baltimore”

“Help the Poor”

“Buy a house for my mother”

“See my children be good people”

“Find Nemo”

“Save a life”

“Help people live a happy life and healthy life”

“Help people”

“World peace”

“Change the world”

“Create change in my community”

“Help more people love others”

“Health, library, recovery services, housing, etc. for Baltimore City.”

“Let people know they are loved.”

Those who view our society as based on acquiring material goods should note that no one wrote that they wanted a better car, more jewelry, or a bigger house for themselves.   

In fact, there only a few responses which even listed personal goals:

IMG_9577fcrop by .

 

 

 

“Skydive/deep sea diving”

“See Paris”

“Run a marathon”

“Be happy”

 

I’m saving a photo of this wish wall onto my desktop to remind me of the real news in our world.

That people are good and they are hoping to help others.

                                                                                            shan

IMG_9570f2 by .

Ideas, Quotes and Ah Ha’s! from the Baltimore Word Camp

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IMG_0420 by .
What is your thinking and decision making style?

Learning events are bright and wonderful–I find myself running about like a child with a butterfly net, trying to capture new ideas and brilliant insights.

Here are a few that I’ve caught for you at the Baltimore WordCamp:

 

Design is not making 1,000 ideas, design is making 1,000 ideas 1 idea.

 –Joe Stewart, Work and Company. 

   There is a great short video by Stewart at this link:

   https://www.facebook.com/PandaConf/videos/1783011578696079/

 

   

Designers are dealers of empathy.

–Joseph Carter-Brown

   Carter-Brown argued that designers were tasked with understanding the users of the product, and creating an experience which  helps them.

 

My dog has a twitter account

 

I didn’t ask whether this person wanted everyone to know this, so she and her dog will remain unnamed, but let’s just say that her dog tweets out messages when the formatting of the message is not certain. 

 

It was the worst thing that happened, until it was the best thing that happened.

     A reflection on how flunking out of school taught a presenter the lessons she needed to be successful in college and life.              Her advice for those starting their own companies?  “Embrace the failures.”

  

The definition of an entrepreneur? 

Someone who works 80 hours a week so they don’t have to work 40 hours a week.

 

    

Baltimore WordPress Camp

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Baltimore WordPress Camp

 

It is a joy to see people teaching and learning together. 

The recent Baltimore WordPress Camp in Baltimore, Maryland was a great example of shared learning.   

My favorite part was the happiness bar–a table where you could ask experts your questions in one-on-one sessions. 

WordPress has a tremendous community of people driven to help each other maximize the power of the internet in sharing ideas and information.   The next local WordPress event is a meetup in Washington DC on Tuesday, October 17th at CHIEF.

https://www.meetup.com/wordpressdc/events/243880318/

 

Here are some images from the two day WordPress Camp in Baltimore. 

You can view additional images  by clicking on the following link:
Gallery Link
To download your images for your personal use, enter this password: WordCamp17Saturday

Experiment US

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Cool Green Schools runs the Experiment You project to help students study and improve their health and learning. America has been running the Experiment US project since 1776, offering citizens the right to... READ MORE

Learning to Live In Baltimore

| |

  How schools can improve the health of students and their communities The 2017 Neighborhood Health Report by the Baltimore City Health Department is hard to read.             ... READ MORE